Resources

This page provides links to useful resources. Please use the comments to report a broken link.

Reading & Resources

Cities for People
Definitely a book worth borrowing or buying! Jan Gehl explores how we can design and upgrade our our towns and cities so people are put first. With history, debate and case studies, this is one of the most interesting and enlightening book I have read in years and it deserves a place in your real or virtual library.

The ConDem coalition government scrapped Cycling England in 2011 to save a paltry £200k a year. The organisation was an independent expert-led body which was gradually becoming an authority on cycling in the UK including a fair bit of work on infrastructure. This link is to some photos of different types on infrastructure. I am not suggesting that it is good, bad or ugly, just that losing this resource was a mistake, but what did you expect from the car-centrics?

An A to Z* of words, terms and organisations which you might need to know more about when you read a technical document, consultation, newspaper or even to hold your own in a cycling and transport conversation!
* actually starts with "2" for 20mph limit.
A great resource available as a PDF produced by Urban Movement. The document provides loads of examples of how different countries deliver cycling infrastructure and the good news is that I reckon much of it could be reproduced in the UK!
Advice on campaigning for a new crossing, selecting crossing types for the non-technical and basic assessment for existing crossings.

Living Transport - Traffic Calming Guidelines
A collaboration between Tim Pharoah and Dorset County Council 20 years ago is still well worth a read.

National advice on how new urban streets should be designed. Some parts are still a bit car-centric, but it is not too bad. It was published in 2007 and so I think needs to be updated.

NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide
If your interest is in how designing for cycling is being achieved in the USA, then this is the book for you. We cannot directly use many of the designs in the UK, but there are great ideas and it certainly broadens one's mind!

NACTO Urban Street Design Guide
This is perhaps more accessible to a UK audience that the Bikeway Design Guide and many concepts could easily be used here without modification. I found the storm water and interim measures sections particularly interesting.
A fantastic highways construction website which will of be interest and use to many people involved in the design and construction of highways or campaigners wanting to brush up on terminology and techniques to take "them" on at "their" own game.

Roads Were Not Built For Cars
Carlton Reid takes us through a huge and detailed history of how it was cyclists who pushed for better roads and how our streets were gradually appropriated for motors - the start of the sleepwalk into todays problems.

Space for Cycling
London Cycle Campaign resources.

Street Fight
This is the story of how Janette Sadik-Khan became New York's transport commissioner and with her team, started to make change happen for active travel, public transport and for people rather than cars in the Big Apple.

Streets & Transport in the Urban Environment
Published by the Chartered Institution of Highways & Transportation, STUE is a suite of guidance documents covering various subjects. I am proud to be the author of one of the documents; "Designing for Walking".

DIY Streets is a Sustrans project that brings communities together to help them redesign their streets, putting people at their heart and making them safer and more attractive places to live.

Tactical Urbanism
From the USA, this books shows how many small (and low cost) interventions can add up to bigger change for our streets and neighbourhoods. 

Brought to you by the Chartered Institute of Logistics & Transport, The Hub is a "home for online cycling resources. Actually, loads of cycling-related stuff!

The Hub has an archive of a very useful document called "Cycle Schemes & Legal Procedures" which is a must read for those wanting to build on-highway cycle tracks and the like.

This is a suite of several documents which provide the guidance on how to design and use traffic signs and road marking. It is a bit easier to follow than the legislation, but some is out of date and doesn't reflect the 2011 amendments.
An excellent website taking a scientific and data-led approach to highway planning including answers to some of the myths surrounding road safety, speeding, and bus lanes. It also poses plenty of questions to make you think.


Technical Posts On This Blog - By Subject

Accessibility
Bus Stop Bypasses


Desire Lines

Filtered Permeability

Footway Parking (hint: I don't like it!)

Hierarchy


Infrastructure Safaris & Visits
http://www.therantyhighwayman.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/copenhagen-not-quite-perfect-but-miles.html

Junctions
Parking & Loading

Risk
Speed Limits
Traffic Signals

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